Self indulgent shit
ultrafacts:

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ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

thegreenwolf:

gallusrostromegalus:

There is a word for the thing the llama is doing. It is the best possible word for this phenomenon.  When an animal moves by moving all four feet like this at once it’s called… PRONKING.
I can’t make stuff like this up.

Okay. I’ve seen various antelope do this. I had NO idea llamas did, too!

thegreenwolf:

gallusrostromegalus:

There is a word for the thing the llama is doing. It is the best possible word for this phenomenon.  When an animal moves by moving all four feet like this at once it’s called… PRONKING.

I can’t make stuff like this up.

Okay. I’ve seen various antelope do this. I had NO idea llamas did, too!

celticlokean:

supershawarmalock:

mmeadowss:

parenting done right

Never not reblog Morticia Addams

I love the expression on her face in the last one. “Can you believe she was going to use such a small blade?”

It’s important for little girls to know not every story has to be a love story and for boys to know that soldiers aren’t the only ones to triumph in war.
Guilermo Del Toro - How Pacific Rim saved his life

“I wanted to show that men and women can be friends without having a relationship,” says del Toro of the relationship between the two main characters Mako (played by Japanese actress Rinko Kikuchi) and Raleigh (“Sons of Anarchy” star Charlie Hunnam). “Theirs is a story about partnership, equality and a strong bond between partners. It’s important for little girls to know not every story has to be a love story and for boys to know that soldiers aren’t the only ones to triumph in war.”

Nice article, worth a read. (via nudityandnerdery)
medievalpoc:

Ancient Art Week!
Black and Asian Prisoners
Egypt (Period of Horemheb (c. 1348-c. 1320 B.C.E.)
Limestone, Monumental Relief.
Paris, Musée national du Louvre, Département des Antiquités égyptiennes.
I hadn’t planned on including Egyptian works of art here for this particular Ancient Art Week, because I find it hard to believe that anyone could still be in doubt over whether or not the people of Ancient Egypt were people of color…but apparently, this is still A Thing.
There are entire books you can read about the sociological history of how applying our modern ideas of race to the Ancient Egyptians has been used pretty blatantly as a sociopolitical tool to either reinforce or try and break down current structures of oppression.
Many European writers on the topic claimed that Egyptians were white, and that any Asiatic or Black people present were servants or slaves. This idea spawned in the 1840s, obviously shaped by the social structures and the scramble to justify the enslavement of Black people, colonialism, and attendant atrocities that were perpetrated upon people of color around the world by the relatively new group of people considered “white”.
If you still harbor any doubt on how that is relevant to our lives today, consider that this work of art is in the Louvre in Paris, France…thousands of stolen artworks have ended up in European museums over the centuries. Also consider that the “theory” linked to above (that Ancient Egyptians were white people out of Europe, who migrated south and “civilized” the “natives” of Egypt!!!) was popular through the 1970s.
To get an overview of the history of migrations, population movement, martial campaigns and conquerors in Ancient Egypt, this Wikipedia article can give a general idea. Both Wikipedia articles I have linked to have extensive footnotes and citations for you to explore in both books and other articles.
In the mid-seventies, a group of scholars put forward evidence that the denizens of Ancient Egypt were what we would consider Black, which was met with a resounding…well, tantrum. It resulted in the white-dominated archaeological community putting their fingers in theirs ears and humming, for the most part, then you see a lot of papers being published that more or less say “why do we even CARE what race they were, anyways!”, which will sound awfully familiar to a lot of readers. Anything deemed “Afrocentric” is often dismissed without even being looked at, to the point where it’s practically a dirty word.
If you really want to analyze how the attribution of race to historical cultures is relevant to our lives right now, consider how many people have sent me messages in regard to Ivan Van Sertima, one of the most controversial of the Afrocentric academics.
I think we can learn a great deal more from sociocultural reactions to the mere idea of centering Black people in historical scholarship than we can from piling on criticism driven by anti-Black racism and subsequent devaluation, don’t you?
The legacy of Ancient Egyptians as white people lives on in the popular consciousness, fueled by books, films, tv shows, video games, and whatever the f*ck this is. What we produce artistically as a culture is heavily influenced by our ideas about the past, and our ideas about the past are shaped by the art our culture produces. In order to break that vicious cycle, we have to re-learn how to think critically and engage media from a position firmly grounded in who we are as people, and how our identities interact with our culture. Our emotional investment in these depictions often decide whether or not the mirror of the past shows us a true image, or whether it was lifted from a funhouse.
After all, my goal here is to attempt to break the idea that there is only “one, TRUE answer” to the questions and mysteries of the past, and rather show that there are MANY answers, and many narratives that we can follow to their conclusions. I believe there is room for that in our studies, in our lives, and in our artistic creations as well.
All I can do is provide what information I have and leads for further research. It is up to you to decide if your vision of the past can include everyone who ever lived-because it actually did.

medievalpoc:

Ancient Art Week!

Black and Asian Prisoners

Egypt (Period of Horemheb (c. 1348-c. 1320 B.C.E.)

Limestone, Monumental Relief.

Paris, Musée national du Louvre, Département des Antiquités égyptiennes.

I hadn’t planned on including Egyptian works of art here for this particular Ancient Art Week, because I find it hard to believe that anyone could still be in doubt over whether or not the people of Ancient Egypt were people of color…but apparently, this is still A Thing.

There are entire books you can read about the sociological history of how applying our modern ideas of race to the Ancient Egyptians has been used pretty blatantly as a sociopolitical tool to either reinforce or try and break down current structures of oppression.

Many European writers on the topic claimed that Egyptians were white, and that any Asiatic or Black people present were servants or slaves. This idea spawned in the 1840s, obviously shaped by the social structures and the scramble to justify the enslavement of Black people, colonialism, and attendant atrocities that were perpetrated upon people of color around the world by the relatively new group of people considered “white”.

If you still harbor any doubt on how that is relevant to our lives today, consider that this work of art is in the Louvre in Paris, France…thousands of stolen artworks have ended up in European museums over the centuries. Also consider that the “theory” linked to above (that Ancient Egyptians were white people out of Europe, who migrated south and “civilized” the “natives” of Egypt!!!) was popular through the 1970s.

To get an overview of the history of migrations, population movement, martial campaigns and conquerors in Ancient Egypt, this Wikipedia article can give a general idea. Both Wikipedia articles I have linked to have extensive footnotes and citations for you to explore in both books and other articles.

In the mid-seventies, a group of scholars put forward evidence that the denizens of Ancient Egypt were what we would consider Black, which was met with a resounding…well, tantrum. It resulted in the white-dominated archaeological community putting their fingers in theirs ears and humming, for the most part, then you see a lot of papers being published that more or less say “why do we even CARE what race they were, anyways!”, which will sound awfully familiar to a lot of readers. Anything deemed “Afrocentric” is often dismissed without even being looked at, to the point where it’s practically a dirty word.

If you really want to analyze how the attribution of race to historical cultures is relevant to our lives right now, consider how many people have sent me messages in regard to Ivan Van Sertima, one of the most controversial of the Afrocentric academics.

I think we can learn a great deal more from sociocultural reactions to the mere idea of centering Black people in historical scholarship than we can from piling on criticism driven by anti-Black racism and subsequent devaluation, don’t you?

The legacy of Ancient Egyptians as white people lives on in the popular consciousness, fueled by books, films, tv shows, video games, and whatever the f*ck this is. What we produce artistically as a culture is heavily influenced by our ideas about the past, and our ideas about the past are shaped by the art our culture produces. In order to break that vicious cycle, we have to re-learn how to think critically and engage media from a position firmly grounded in who we are as people, and how our identities interact with our culture. Our emotional investment in these depictions often decide whether or not the mirror of the past shows us a true image, or whether it was lifted from a funhouse.

After all, my goal here is to attempt to break the idea that there is only “one, TRUE answer” to the questions and mysteries of the past, and rather show that there are MANY answers, and many narratives that we can follow to their conclusions. I believe there is room for that in our studies, in our lives, and in our artistic creations as well.

All I can do is provide what information I have and leads for further research. It is up to you to decide if your vision of the past can include everyone who ever lived-because it actually did.

1021girl:

snickerdoodlesandsausages:

enjolrasactual:

in-love-with-my-bed:

the-winchesters-creed:

ayellowstateofmind:

Imagine stabbing someone with this knife. 

It would instantly cauterize the would, so the person wouldn’t bleed, so it’s not very useful.

if you want information it is

and above, in order, we see a gryffindor, a ravenclaw, and a slytherin

why would you stab a PERSON when you can have TOAST?

There’s the hufflepuff

1021girl:

snickerdoodlesandsausages:

enjolrasactual:

in-love-with-my-bed:

the-winchesters-creed:

ayellowstateofmind:

Imagine stabbing someone with this knife. 

It would instantly cauterize the would, so the person wouldn’t bleed, so it’s not very useful.

if you want information it is

and above, in order, we see a gryffindor, a ravenclaw, and a slytherin

why would you stab a PERSON when you can have TOAST?

There’s the hufflepuff

jessi2222:

This speaks to me on so many levels

jessi2222:

This speaks to me on so many levels

startrekspeare:

"what’s a queen without her king?" well, historically, better